The Difference Between Taking the Oath and the “Oath Keepers”

The Difference Between Taking the Oath and the “Oath Keepers

I’ve written many blogs concerning taking the oath for military service. As a military man I have relied heavily on the Oath of Enlistment as my obligation to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies.

I read an article about the so-called “Oath Keepers” radical militant militia group that seemed to have been the tip of the spear on January 6th, 2021 at the Capitol. The DOJ has come out and falsely “associated” MAGA folks with those who stormed the Capitol and caused damage inside.

What appears to have happened is collusion between DOJ, FBI and even DOD officials to protect the single most responsible person – Elmer “Stewart” Rhodes III, founder and kingpin of “Oath Keepers” for his role at the Capitol on January 6th and the days leading up to it.

As I have previously written there was no secret gathering of angry MAGA supporters being egged on by President Trump and in fact the event was well publicized and a group like Oath Keepers most likely coordinated their preplanned activities to coincide with the MAGA rally moving down to the Capitol after Trump’s speech ended.  

The Oath Keepers founder Elmer “Stewart” Rhodes III having been an army paratrooper and a disbarred Yale Law School graduate with connections inside army counterintelligence and the FBI make the “attack on democracy” appear to be inside job.

The commonality of each of the Oaths of Office/Enlistment is to the Constitution of the United States. The only oath that does not specify to defend the Constitution is that taken by Members of Congress, which is only to support the Constitution. The Justices of the Supreme Court are required to take two oaths before they may execute the duties of their appointed office.

Oaths of the Supreme Court Justices

Oaths taken by all federal employees, other than the President:

“I, _________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

The Judicial Oath

“I, _________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________ under the Constitution and laws of the United States. So help me God.”

On occasion, appointees to the Supreme Court have taken a combined version of the two oaths.

The Combined Oath

“I, _________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________ under the Constitution and laws of the United States; and that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

The Oath of Office taken by the President of the United States says he will preserve, protect and defend the Constitution.

President

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States.” — The Constitution of the United States, Article II, Section 1

Members of Congress are bound by Oath to support the Constitution.

Members of Congress

“The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.”
— U.S. Constitution, Article VI, clause 3

Oath taken by Civil Service or Federal Civilians is to support and defend the Constitution.

Oath of Office for Civil Service or Federal Civilians

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

I have never considered that military officers take what is called an Oath of Office which is different than the Oath of Enlistment which insures the lawful orders of the President and the officers appointed over enlisted should be followed without question to maintain order and discipline in the ranks of the US military while the Oath of Office is to support and defend the Constitution.

Oath of Office for Commissioned Officers

I, ______________, having been appointed an officer in the (Branch of Service) of the United States as indicated above in the grade of ___________ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. So help me God.

The Oath taken by military members is to support and defend the Constitution and to obey the orders of the President and the officers appointed over them.

Oath of Enlistment

I, _______________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me according to law and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

There are those in Congress who have not taken an oath to defend the Constitution, but assume military members hold their allegiance to former President Trump and therefore must be identified and cleansed or removed from military service because of how seriously they view the Oath.

Congress is wrong in their assumption and also wrong when bypassing the Commander in Chief to communicate directly with DOD leadership. It is also wrong for DOD leadership to allow such communication to occur. It is also wrong for the DOD to politicalize and demonize members of the military for their personal political beliefs or political party affiliation.

A side note – there is no “religious” test for elected or appointed political office and to do so is a violation of the rights guaranteed under the Constitution. – I am the Real Truckmaster!

Realtruckmaster.blog

MeWe.Com/The_Real_Truckmaster_Series_2021

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