Conspiracy versus Collusion

1-4-2019

 

Conspiracy versus Collusion

 

 

I know what you’re thinking with all the hype about Trump and the Russians colluding to influence the 2016 elections and all, well it’s not about that. So to begin let us start by defining the terms of Conspiracy and Collusion.

 

Definitions

https://grammarist.com/usage/conspiracy-vs-collusion/

 

Conspiracy describes two or more people secretly plotting an action, usually but not limited to a harmful or illegal action. Conspiracy may refer to the plot itself or the act of planning of the plot. Conspiracy comes from the Old French word conspiracie, which means plot or conspiracy. The plural form is conspiracies, the verb form is conspire. 

 

Collusion describes two or more people secretly plotting an illegal or fraudulent action. Collusion may refer to the plot itself or the act of planning the plot. Collusion comes from the Old French word, collusion. The verb form is collude. Remember, conspiracy describes a secret plot that may or may not be illegal, collusion is always an illegal or fraudulent plot.

 

Since its inception in 1971 the Congressional Black Caucus has fought for the equal treatment and equal rights of blacks in America. However that has not been the case for quite some time. They have become the standard barrier for inciting racism within the federal government. They have strong ties within the Democratic Party, to Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam and to the Black Lives Matters. Their esteemed alumni include then Senator and now former President Barack H. Obama.

 

The Congressional Black Caucus has sought out and implied racist connections within the White House and the Trump Administration while totally ignoring their own racist goings on within the Congress of the United States. I have written about the Congressional Black Caucus in the past 2 years and have been criticized as them being a “nothing-burger” or my having given the Congressional Black Caucus too much credit.

 

So this phase of research is to provide more details on one of 512 Congressional Caucuses within the Legislative Branch. The Congressional Black Caucus is much more than a simple caucus, but in my opinion has crossed over the line as a Congressional Lobbying Organization with an unprecedented Voting Block which has at its core inherently racist underpinnings.

 

A stated goal of the Congressional Black Caucus is to “Root out Racism in federal policy, the White House and on Federal Property”. They have taken it upon themselves to become the congressional pit bull against anyone or anything they deem offensive or racist.

 

I find it hard to take the Congressional Black Caucus seriously when by their very name and membership criteria is restrictive to blacks (African-Americans) while refusing membership based upon the same criteria and those who qualify but choose not to join or refuse membership are ostracized and have had their names posted to the CBC official website.

 

What I see posted on their Congressional Black Caucus  for the 115th Congress and in news releases are their membership is expected to increase to 55 members or more after the 116th Congress has been sworn in. They expect to chair 5 House Committees and infuse CBC membership into 28 Subcommittees. CBC membership crosses both party lines and between the House and the Senate in what is stated as flexing its Voting Block muscles within the Congress.

 

Congressional Black Caucus members are either chairing (ranking members) or members of following House Committees:

 

  • The responsibilities and goals of the House Committee on Agriculture are as diverse as the needs of American agriculture. They face issues as varied as renewable energy, rural development, nutrition, crop insurance, conservation, international trade, futures market regulation, animal and plant health, agricultural research and development, bioterrorism, forestry and many others.
    • David Scott (D-GA-13)
    • Marcia L. Fudge (D-OH-11)
    • Alma Adams (D-NC-12)
    • Stacey Plaskett (D-VI)
    • Dwight Evans (D-PA-02)
    • Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-DE)
    • Al Lawson (D-FL-05)

 

  • The Appropriations Committee – comprised of 28 Republicans and 22 Democrats and organized into 12 subcommittees – is responsible for writing the laws that fund the federal government’s myriad responsibilities.
    • Sanford Bishop (D-GA-02)
    • Barbara Lee (D-CA-13)

 

  • The oversight responsibilities of the Committee on Armed Services are conducted throughout the calendar year. They are instrumental in the committee’s consideration of the annual defense authorization bill, which covers the breadth of the operations of the Department of Defense as well as the national security functions of the Department of Energy and other related areas. The annual national defense budget involves millions of military and civilian personnel, thousands of facilities, and hundreds of agencies, departments, and commands located throughout the world. Contingency operations related to the global war on terrorism will continue to expand the range of topics requiring committee oversight including strategic, operational, and budgetary issues of great scope and complexity.
    • Marc Veasey (D-TX-33)
    • Anthony Brown (D-MD-04)
    • A. Donald McEachin (D-VA-04)

 

  • The Budget Committee’s chief responsibility is to draft an annual concurrent resolution that provides a Congressional framework for spending and revenue levels, the federal surplus or deficit, and public debt. The budget resolution can contain reconciliation instructions directing authorizing committees to change laws in their jurisdiction to change revenues or mandatory spending levels. The resolution also can include mechanisms that aid in enforcing budget procedures in general or for particular purposes. In drafting the budget resolution, the Committee examines the President’s annual budget request, as well as economic and fiscal projections from the Congressional Budget Office. The Committee also has jurisdiction over budget process laws, and tracks the budgetary effects of legislative action.
    • Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX-18)
    • Barbara Lee (D-CA-13)
    • Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY-08)

 

  • The Committee on Education and the Workforce’s purpose is to ensure that Americans’ needs are addressed so that students and workers may move forward in a changing school system and a competitive global economy. The committee and its four subcommittees oversee education and workforce programs that affect all Americans, from early learning through secondary education, from job training through retirement.
    • Bobby Scott (D-VA-02), Ranking Member
    • Frederica S. Wilson (D-FL-24)
    • Marcia L. Fudge (D-OH-11)
    • Alma Adams (D-NC-12)
    • Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-DE)

 

  • The Energy and Commerce Committee has responsibility for matters including telecommunications, consumer protection, food and drug safety, public health and research, environmental quality, energy policy, and interstate and foreign commerce among others.

o   Rep. Bobby Rush (D-IL-01)

o   Rep. G. K. Butterfield (D-NC-01)

o   Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-NY-09)

 

  • The House Committee on Ethicsis the only standing committee of the House whose membership is evenly divided between each political party. The Committee includes five members of each party. Also, unlike other committees, the day-to-day work of the Committee on Ethics is conducted by a staff that is nonpartisan by rule. Under House rules, the Committee has the jurisdiction to administer travel, gift, financial disclosure, outside income, and other regulations; advise members and staff; issue advisory opinions and investigate potential ethics violations.
    • Yvette Clarke (D-NY-09)
    • Anthony Brown (D-MD-04)

 

  • The Financial Services Committee oversees all components of the nation’s housing and financial services sectors including banking, insurance, real estate, public and assisted housing, and securities. The Committee continually reviews the laws and programs relating to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Federal Reserve Bank, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and international development and finance agencies such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. The Committee also ensures enforcement of housing and consumer protection laws such as the U.S. Housing Act, the Truth In Lending Act, the Housing and Community Development Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, the Community Reinvestment Act, and financial privacy laws.
    • Maxine Waters (D-CA-43), Ranking Member
    • Gregory Meeks (D-NY-05)
    • William Lacy Clay, Jr. (D-MO-01)
    • David Scott (D-GA-13)
    • Emanuel Cleaver, II (D-MO-05)
    • Al Green (D-TX-09)
    • Gwen Moore (D-WI-04)
    • Keith Ellison (D-MN-05)
    • Joyce Beatty (D-OH-03)
    • Mia Love (R-UT-04)

 

  • The Foreign Affairs Committee is responsible for oversight and legislation relating to: foreign assistance (including development assistance, Millennium Challenge Corporation, the Millennium Challenge Account, HIV/AIDS in foreign countries, security assistance, and Public Law 480 programs abroad); national security developments affecting foreign policy; strategic planning and agreements; war powers, treaties, executive agreements, and the deployment and use of United States Armed Forces; peacekeeping, peace enforcement, and enforcement of United Nations or other international sanctions; arms control and disarmament issues; the United States Agency for International Development; activities and policies of the State, Commerce, and Defense Departments and other agencies related to the Arms Export Control Act and the Foreign Assistance Act, including export and licensing policy for munitions items and technology and dual-use equipment and technology; international law; promotion of democracy; international law enforcement issues, including narcotics control programs and activities; Broadcasting Board of Governors; embassy security; international broadcasting; public diplomacy, including international communication and information policy, and international education and exchange programs; and all other matters not specifically assigned to a subcommittee. The full Committee will have jurisdiction over legislation with respect to the administration of the Export Administration Act, including the export and licensing of dual-use equipment and technology and other matters related to international economic policy and trade not otherwise assigned to a subcommittee, and with respect to the United Nations, its affiliated agencies, and other international organizations, including assessed and voluntary contributions to such organizations. The Committee may conduct oversight and investigations with respect to any matter within the jurisdiction of the Committee as defined in the Rules of the House of Representatives
    • Gregory Meeks (D-NY-05)
    • Karen Bass (D-CA-37)
    • Robin Kelly (D-IL-02)

 

  • The Homeland Security Committee was established in 2002 to provide Congressional oversight for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and better protect the American people against a possible terrorist attack.
    • Bennie Thompson (D-MS-02), Ranking Member
      Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX-18)
      Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-LA-02)
      Rep. Donald M. Payne, Jr. (D-NY-10)
      Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ-12)
      Rep. Val Butler Demings (D-FL-10)

 

  • The House Committee on Natural Resources considers legislation about American energy production, mineral lands and mining, fisheries and wildlife, public lands, oceans, Native Americans, irrigation and reclamation.
    • William Lacy Clay, Jr. (D-MO-01)
    • Anthony Brown (D-MD-04)
    • A. Donald McEachin (D-VA-04)

 

  • The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is the main investigative committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. It has authority to investigate the subjects within the Committee’s legislative jurisdiction as well as “any matter” within the jurisdiction of the other standing House Committees.
    • Elijah Cummings (D-MD-07), Ranking Member
    • Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC)
    • William Lacy Clay, Jr. (D-MO-01)
    • Robin Kelly (D-IL-02)
    • Brenda Lawrence (D-MI-14)
    • Stacey Plaskett (D-VI)
    • Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ-12)
    • Val Butler Demings (D-FL-10)

 

  • The Committee on Rules was first created as a select (or temporary) committee on April 2, 1789, later becoming a standing committee from 1849-53 and permanently retaining that function from 1880 until the present. The Rules Committee’s role has evolved dramatically since its inception. Starting out as a select committee that only reported general House rules, the modern Rules Committee’s main function is to report “special rules” governing the consideration of major legislation. Among other things, special rules govern which legislation can go to the House Floor, when legislation goes to the Floor, how long bills can be debated, which amendments can be offered and who can offer them.
    • Alcee Hastings (D-FL-20)

 

  • The Science, Space, and Technology Committee has jurisdiction over much of the non-defense Federal research and development (R&D) portfolio. The Committee has exclusive jurisdiction over the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The Committee also has authority over R&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Weather Service (NWS), and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).
    • Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX-30), Ranking Member
    • Marc Veasey (D-TX-33)

 

  • The U. S. House of Representatives created the House Select Committee on Small Business in 1941 as a means to provide direct oversight and consideration of matters affecting small firms. This Select Committee was reauthorized each Congress until 1975, when it was made a permanent standing committee of the House. As a result, it was given certain areas of legislative jurisdiction and the specific responsibility to oversee the wide-range of challenges facing small businesses.
    • Alma Adams (D-NC-12)
    • Yvette Clarke (D-NY-09)
    • Dwight Evans (D-PA-02)
    • Al Lawson (D-FL-05)

 

  • The House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has jurisdiction over all modes of transportation: aviation, maritime and waterborne transportation, highways, bridges, mass transit, and railroads. The Committee also has jurisdiction over other aspects of our national infrastructure, such as clean water and waste water management, the transport of resources by pipeline, flood damage reduction, the management of federally owned real estate and public buildings, the development of economically depressed rural and urban areas, disaster preparedness and response, and hazardous materials transportation.
    • Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC)
    • Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX-30)
    • Elijah Cummings (D-MD-07)
    • Hank Johnson (D-GA-04)
    • André Carson (D-IN-07)
    • Frederica S. Wilson (D-FL-24)
    • Donald M. Payne, Jr. (D-NJ-10)
    • Brenda Lawrence (D-MI-14)

 

  • The Committee on Ways and Means is the oldest committee of the United States Congress, and is the chief tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives. The Committee derives a large share of its jurisdiction from Article I, Section VII of the U.S. Constitution which declares, “All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives.”
    • John Lewis (D-GA-05)
    • Danny Davis (D-IL-07)
    • Terri Sewell (D-AL-07)

 

  • The United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI) is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. Created in 1977, HPSCI is charged with oversight of the United States Intelligence Community—which includes the intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the following seventeen elements of the U.S. Government—and the Military Intelligence Program.
    • André Carson (D-IN-07)
    • Terri Sewell (D-AL-07)

 

  • S. Senate Committees

 

 

 

Many Congressional Black Caucus  members are on multiple House Committees as well as the following Congressional Black Caucus Taskforces and Working Groups.

 

HBCU (House Black Caucus Universities)

  • American Baptist College
    • John Lewis
  • Central State University
    • Joyce Beatty
  • Clark Atlanta University
    • Hank Johnson
  • Fisk University
    • John Lewis
    • Alcee Hastings
    • Frederica Wilson
  • Florida A&M University
    • David Scott
    • Al Green
    • Alcee Hastings
    • Al Lawson
  • Howard University
    • Elijah Cummings
    • Kamala Harris
    • Alcee Hastings
    • Gregory Meeks
    • David Scott
  • Jackson State University
    • Bennie Thompson
  • Morehouse College
    • Cedric Richmond
  • North Carolina A&T State University
    • Alma Adams
  • North Carolina Central University
    • G.K. Butterfield
  • Prairie View A&M University
    • Eddie Bernice Johnson
    • Emanuel Cleaver
  • South Carolina State University
    • James Clyburn
  • Texas Southern University
    • Al Green
    • Hank Johnson
  • Tougaloo College
    • Bennie Thompson
  • Tuskegee University
    • Al Green
  • Virginia Union University
    • A. Donald McEachin
  • Wiley College
    • Eddie Bernice Johnson

 

 

Caucuses

  • Bipartisan Congressional HBCUS Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alma Adams
  • Childhood Cancer Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. G.K. Butterfield
  • Congressional Afghan Caucus
    • Co-Chair Sheila Jackson Lee
  • Congressional Automotive and Performance and Motorsports Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Sanford D. Bishop, Jr.
  • Congressional Aviation Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey
  • Congressional Blue Collar Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey
  • Congressional Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey
  • Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls
    • Co-Chair Rep. Robin Kelly
    • Co-Chair Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman
    • Co-Chair Rep. Yvette Clarke
  • Congressional Caucus on Bosnia
    • Co-Chair Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson
  • Congressional Caucus on Foster Youth
    • Co-Chair Rep. Karen Bass
    • Co-Chair Rep. Brenda Lawrence
  • Congressional Caucus on Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality Technologies
    • Co-Chair Rep. Yvette Clark
  • Congressional Caucus on Women’s Issues
    • Co-Chair Rep. Brenda Lawrence
  • Congressional Children’s Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
  • Congressional Caribbean Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Maxine Waters
    • Co-Chair Rep. Yvette Clarke
    • Co-Chair Del. Stacey Plaskett
  • Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus
    • Co-Chair Mia Love
  • Congressional Diversifying Tech Caucus
  • Co-Chair Rep. Robin Kelly
  • Congressional European Union Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Gregory Meeks
  • Congressional Everglades Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alcee L. Hastings
  • Congressional Financial And Economic Literacy Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Joyce Beatty
  • Congressional Free File Caucus
    • Co-Chair Re. G.K. Butterfield
  • Congressional Heart and Stroke Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Joyce Beatty
  • Congressional Higher Education Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. André Carson
  • Congressional Homelessness Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alcee Hastings
  • Congressional Home Protection Caucus
    • Co-Chair Cedric L. Richmond
  • Congressional House Sugar Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alcee L. Hastings
  • Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Barbara Lee
  • Congressional Lupus Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson
  • Congressional Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Gregory W. Meeks
  • Congressional Minor League Baseball Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Cedric L. Richmond
  • Congressional Multicultural Media Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Yvette Clarke
  • Congressional Men’s Health Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Donald M. Payne, Jr.
  • Congressional Military Family Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Sanford D. Bishop, Jr.
  • Congressional Nigeria Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
  • Congressional Oral Health Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Elijah Cummings
  • Congressional Out of Poverty Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Barbara Lee
    • Co-Chair Rep. G.K. Butterfield
  • Congressional Peanut Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Sanford D. Bishop, Jr.
  • Congressional Pediatric Trauma Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. G.K. Butterfield
  • Congressional Pollinator Protection Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alcee L. Hastings
  • Congressional Rare Disease Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. G.K. Butterfield
  • Congressional Refinery Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Cedric L. Richmond
  • Congressional Rock and Roll Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marcia L. Fudge
  • Congressional Skilled American Workforce Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Brenda Lawrence
  • Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey
  • Congressional Somalia Caucus
    • Co-Chair Keith Ellison
  • Congressional Sudan and South Sudan Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Barbara Lee
  • Congressional Texas Maritime Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson
  • Congressional Tunisia Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alcee L. Hastings
  • Congressional Voting Rights Task Force
    • Co-Chair Rep. Bobby Scott
    • Co-Chair Rep. Terri Sewell
    • Co-Chair Marc Veasey
  • Congressional Working Forests Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Sanford D. Bishop, Jr.
  • Congressional Youth Sports Caucus
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey

 

Groups, Task Forces & Committees

  • Cuba Working Group
    • Co-Chair Rep. Barbara Lee
  • Democratic Budget Group
    • Co-Chair Rep. Robin Kelly
  • Democratic Faith Working Group
    • Co-Chair Rep. James E. Clyburn
  • Democratic Israel Working Group
    • Co-Chair Rep. Alcee Hastings
  • Democratic Women’s Working Group
    • Co-Chair Rep. Brenda Lawrence
  • Access to Jobs Task Force
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey
    • Co-Chair Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester
  • Congressional Childhood Obesity Taskforce
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marcia L. Fudge
  • Democratic Whip Task Force on Poverty, Income Inequality and Opportunity
    • Co-Chair Barbara Lee
  • Gun Violence Prevention Task Force
    • Co-Chair Rep. Bobby Scott
    • Co-Chair Rep. Robin Kelly
    • Co-Chair Rep. Val Butler Demings
  • The Bipartisan Taskforce for Combating Anti-Semitism
    • Co-Chair Rep. Marc Veasey
  • The Congressional Task Force on Election Security
    • Co-Chair Rep. Bennie G. Thompson
  • United for Climate and Environmental Justice Task Force
    • Co-Chair Rep. A. Donald McEachin
  • House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee
    • Co-Chair Rep. Hakeem Jeffries
  • House Democratic Policy and Steering Committee
    • Co-Chair Rep. Barbara Lee

 

What is clear to me is that the Congressional Black Caucus has strategically placed members in key positions within certain Committees and/or Caucuses as to influence the legislative agenda of the entire Congress.

 

Scrolling through the Congressional Black Caucus website what is also clear to me is their hatred of President Trump that greatly exceeds the Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS) of the liberal left and the Democratic Party. Having become emboldened since their 1971 inception their stated purpose is to stop Trump at all costs.

 

When I look at the Congressional Black Caucus’s involvement in Caucuses, Committees, Taskforces and Working Groups it is hard to understand how Congress is able to function at all. This may also explain why Congress is at a dead stop when it comes to full-fledged resistance of President Trump’s agenda for draining the swamp and making American great again.

 

My questions are many, but because money equals power and in Washington D.C.

 

I wonder how these “committees” are funded.

 

I wonder what kind of financial “kickbacks” find their way into the pockets of unscrupulous legislators or Congressional Black Caucus members.

 

I wonder how much “cross contamination” exists between House and Senate that violate the intent of the Constitution of the United States or existing U.S. laws concerning Conspiracy and/or  Collusion between the Congressional Black Caucus, the Democratic Party, and individual legislators as they conspire to stop President Trump from Executive Actions and Enforcement of national security, domestic and foreign policy decisions and Presidential Actions.

 

Do the statutes of RICO apply?

https://www.justice.gov/jm/criminal-resource-manual-109-rico-charges

 

As stated earlier there are 512 Congressional Caucuses in Congress, up from the 426 of 2017 when President Trump was inaugurated into office. Now if each of the 512 Congressional Caucuses had roughly 50+ active members vying for specific legislative outcomes (blocking Trump or passing pork barrel projects, attached to legislation) it would be perfectly clear that the Congress would be greatly overwhelmed by the sheer volume of such legislation.

 

I am prepared to revisit and update this document as events unfold after the 116th Congress has been fully sworn in, committees assigned and in the even they actually convene to the legislative work each has been elected to perform and to uphold the Constitution. – I am the Real Truckmaster!

 

Realtruckmaster.blog

MeWe.Com/The_Real_Truckmaster_Series

 

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