Where is Your Allegiance?

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2-18-2019

Where is Your Allegiance?

 

Serious questions demand serious answers, “Where is your allegiance”; “For whom would you lay down your life”?

 

As a Christian my allegiance is to God who made everything and chose me to be his. It is God who said trust me and I will carry you the trials and tribulations of life. Yet it is I who say, “Yes Lord I trust in you”. The choice is mine. The bible tells us that death is not to be feared and to be absent from the body is to be present with God.

 

We often teach our children in Sunday school to recite a pledge to the Christian Flag so they understand where their allegiance is.

 

“I pledge allegiance to the Christian Flag and to the Savior for whose Kingdom it stands. One Savior, crucified, risen, and coming again with life and liberty to all who believe.”

 

In our schools we teach our children to recite the Pledge of Allegiance so they understand the concept of our nation and its relationship to Almighty God and to each other.

 

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands. One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

 

We should not take any oath lightly because they are not just a pledge or promise to either a king or to God. An oath is a vow or specific promise or pledge to act or behave in a specific manner. When you can take an oath of office to promise to perform your duty to the best of your ability, taking that oath or vow requires that promise must be fulfilled. In order for someone to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States, that question is dealt with at Armed Forces Induction Centers across the nation when successful candidates for military service are sworn in and take the oath of enlistment.

 

Oath of Enlistment

 

I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.”

(Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective 5 October 1962)

 

While serving in the Armed Forces it is during the initial basic training that soldiers are taught to learn and abide by the Code of Conduct.

 

 

The Code of the U.S. Fighting Force

The Code of the U.S. Fighting Force is a code of conduct that is an ethics guide and a United States Department of Defense directive consisting of six articles to members of the United States Armed Forces, addressing how they should act in combat when they must evade capture, resist while a prisoner or escape from the enemy.

 

Articles of Code of Conduct

 

The Code of Conduct provides guidance for the behavior and actions of members of the Armed Forces of the United States. This guidance applies not only on the battlefield, but also in the event that the service member is captured and becomes a prisoner of war (POW). The Code is delineated in six articles.

 

Article I:

I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

 

Article II:

I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.

 

Article III:

If I am captured I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

 

Article IV:

If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

 

Article V:

When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give name, rank, service number and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause.

 

Article VI:

I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

 

It is very important to learn this code of conduct in the event a soldier is taken as a prisoner of war by the enemy.

 

What we tend to overlook is what oath do new citizens take after passing their citizenship tests? Do they simply raise their right hand and say, “I do”? I don’t think so. Unless you have been there or have a loved one come from another country to the United States and complete the process of becoming a citizen you don’t really know?

 

New citizens must take a Naturalization Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America in order to complete the citizenship process.

 

 

Naturalization Oath of Allegiance to the United States of America

 

Oath

 

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”

 

Note: In certain circumstances there can be a modification or waiver of the Oath of Allegiance. Read Chapter 5 of A Guide to Naturalization for more information.

 

The principles embodied in the Oath are codified in Section 337(a) in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which provides that all applicants shall take an oath that incorporates the substance of the following:

Support the Constitution;

Renounce and abjure absolutely and entirely all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which the applicant was before a subject or citizen;

Support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic;

Bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and

  1. Bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; or
    B. Perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; or
    C. Perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law.

 

The language of the current Oath is found in the Code of Federal Regulations Section 337.1 and is closely based upon the statutory elements in Section 337(a) of the INA.

As a Wilson, my allegiance is to love, protect and defend my family against all enemies and all threats.
 

What we see happening today are the carefully planned and orchestrated acts of civil unrest and disruption of racial harmony where the uninformed masses are made to react due to lack of common sense and their own ignorance of the Immigration Laws of the United States. – I am the Real Truckmaster!

 

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