My Thoughts on the Secure Fence Act of 2006

7-12-2019

 

My Thoughts on the Secure Fence Act of 2006

(and other immigration issues)

 

The Secure Fence Act of 2006 was passed in 2006 and signed into law by President George W. Bush (R) on October 26, 2006. Its stated purpose was to “establish operational control over the international land and maritime borders of the United States.” Most debate around the law surrounded a provision that required the building of 700 miles of new fencing along the southern border with Mexico. Supporters argued the fence would improve national security and reduce illegal immigration, while opponents argued that the fence would not effectively reduce illegal immigration and could worsen national security. As of 2016, the border with Mexico was lined with 650 miles of partial fencing.

 

H.R. 6061 (109th): Secure Fence Act of 2006

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/votes/109-2006/s262

 

What I find interesting are votes by those who have become high profile individuals since this 2006 vote yet we are still vigorously discussing illegal immigration along our southern border in 2019?

 

 

Nay Sen Bob Menendez D-NJ

Nay Sen Daniel Inouye D-HI

Nay Sen Harry Reid D-WV

Nay Sen John Kerry D-MA

Nay Sen Joseph Lieberman D-CT

Nay Sen Ken Salazar D-CO

Nay Sen Lincoln Chafee R-RI

Nay Sen Richard Durbin D-IL

NO VOTE Sen Ted Kennedy D-MA (deceased)

Yea Sen Barack Obama D-IL

Yea Sen Barbara Boxer D-CA

Yea Sen Chuck Schumer D-NY

Yea Sen Dianne Feinstein D-CA

Yea Sen Hillary Clinton D-NY

Yea Sen John McCain R-AZ (deceased)

Yea Sen Joseph Biden D-DE

Yea Sen Lisa Murkowski R-AK

 

 

 

These are all the recorded votes by members of the Senate in 2006.

 

 

Yea Sen Jeff Sessions R-AL

Yea Sen Richard Shelby R-AL

Yea Sen Lisa Murkowski R-AK

Yea Sen Ted Stevens R-AK

Yea Sen Jon Kyl R-AZ

Yea Sen John McCain R-AZ

Yea Sen Lincoln Blanche D-AR

Yea Sen Mark Prior D-AR

Yea Sen Barbara Boxer D-CA

Yea Sen Dianne Feinstein D-CA

Yea Sen Wayne Allard R-CO

Nay Sen Ken Salazar D-CO

Yea Sen Christopher Dodd D-CT

Nay Sen Joseph Lieberman D-CT

Yea Sen Joseph Biden D-DE

Yea Sen Thomas Carper D-DE

Yea Sen Mel Martinez R-FL

Yea Sen Bill Nelson D-FL

Yea Sen Saxby Chambliss R-GA

Yea Sen John Isakson R-GA

Nay Sen Daniel Akaka D-HI

Nay Sen Daniel Inouye D-HI

Yea Sen Larry Craig R-ID

Yea Sen Michael Crapo R-ID

Nay Sen Richard Durbin D-IL

Yea Sen Barack Obama D-IL

Yea Sen Evan Bayh D-IN

Yea Sen Richard Lugar R-IN

Yea Sen Chuck Grassley R-IA

Yea Sen Tom Harkin D-IA

Yea Sen Sam Brownback R-KS

Yea Sen Pat Roberts R-KS

Yea Sen Jim Bunning R-KY

Yea Sen Mitch McConnell R-KY

Yea Sen Mary Landrieu D-LA

Yea Sen David Vitter R-LA

Yea Sen Susan Collins R-ME

Yea Sen Olympia Snowe R-ME

Yea Sen Barbara Mikulski D-MD

Nay Sen Paul Sarbanes D-MD

NO VOTE Sen Ted Kennedy D-MA

Nay Sen John Kerry D-MA

Nay Sen Carl Levin D-MI

Yea Sen Debbie Stabenow D-MI

Yea Sen Norm Coleman R-MN

Yea Sen Mark Dayton D-MN

Yea Sen Thad Cochran R-MS

Yea Sen Trent Lott R-MS

Yea Sen Kit Bond R-MO

Yea Sen Jim Talent R-MO

Yea Sen Max Baucus D-MT

Yea Sen Conrad Burns R-MT

Yea Sen Chuck Hagel R-NE

Yea Sen Ben Nelson D-NE

Yea Sen John Ensign R-NV

Nay Sen Harry Reid D-NV

Yea Sen Judd Gregg R-NH

Yea Sen John Sununu R-NH

Nay Sen Frank Lautenberg D-NJ

Nay Sen Bob Menendez D-NJ

Nay Sen Jeff Bingaman D-NM

Yea Sen Pete Domenici R-NM

Yea Sen Hillary Clinton D-NY

Yea Sen Chuck Schumer D-NY

Yea Sen Richard Burr R-NC

Yea Sen Elizabeth Dole R-NC

Yea Sen Kent Conrad D-ND

Yea Sen Bryan Dorgan D-ND

Yea Sen Mike DeWine R-OH

Yea Sen George Voinovich R-OH

Yea Sen Thomas Coburn R-OK

Yea Sen Jim Inhofe R-OK

Yea Sen Gordon Smith R-OR

Yea Sen Ron Wyden D-OR

Yea Sen Rick Santorum R-PA

Yea Sen Arlen Specter R-PA

Nay Sen Lincoln Chafee R-RI

Nay Sen John Reed D-RI

Yea Sen Jim DeMint R-SC

Yea Sen Lindsey Graham R-SC

Yea Sen Tim Johnson D-SD

Yea Sen John Thune R-SD

Yea Sen Lamar Alexander R-TN

Yea Sen Bill Frist R-TN

Yea Sen John Cornyn R-TX

Yea Sen Kay Hutchinson R-TX

Yea Sen Robert Bennett R-UT

Yea Sen Orrin Hatch R-UT

Nay Sen Jim Jeffords I-VT

Nay Sen Patrick Leahy D-VT

Yea Sen George Allen R-VA

Yea Sen John Warner R-VA

Nay Sen Maria Cantwell D-WA

Nay Sen Patty Murray D-WA

Yea Sen Robert Byrd D-WV

Yea Sen Jay Rockefeller D-WV

Nay Sen Russell Feingold D-WI

Yea Sen Herb Kohl D-WI

Yea Sen Michael Enzi R-WY

Yea Sen Craig Thomas R-WY

 

 

On Passage of the Bill in the Senate

This was a vote to pass H.R. 6061 (109th) in the Senate.

Totals                 All Votes              Republicans           Democrats            Independents

Yea                     80%   80               54                                  26                              0

Nay                    19%   19                  1                                  17                              1

Not Voting         1%     1                   0                                    1                               0

Bill Passed.

Simple Majority Required. Sep 29, 2006 at 9:30 p.m. ET. Source: senate.gov.

 

On October 26, 2006, U.S. President George W. Bush signed the Secure Fence Act of 2006 (Pub.L. 109–

367) into law stating, “This bill will help protect the American people. This bill will make our borders more secure. It is an important step toward immigration reform.”

 

The bill was introduced on September 13, 2006 by Congressman Peter T. King, Republican of New York.

In the House of Representatives, the Fence Act passed 283–138 on September 14, 2006.

On September 29, 2006 – the Fence Act passed in the Senate 80–19.

 

This summary is from Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Fence_Act_of_2006

 

PROVISIONS

 

Border surveillance

Section 2 of the Secure Fence Act directed the secretary of homeland security to implement a system of surveillance for the land and sea borders of the United States, which included the use of the following: [2]

  • unmanned aerial vehicles
  • ground-based sensors
  • satellites
  • radar coverage
  • cameras

 

The law also directed the secretary to make improvements to physical infrastructure related to border security and the duties of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, such as checkpoints, weather access roads, and vehicle barriers. Under this section, the secretary was also given the authority to take all actions necessary and appropriate to deter and prevent unlawful entry into the United States.[2]

 

Border fence

Section 3 of the Secure Fence Act directed the secretary of homeland security to provide for the construction of a double-layered fence through the following areas, totaling 700 miles in length: [2][4]

(i) extending from 10 miles west of the Tecate, California, port of entry to 10 miles east of the Tecate, California, port of entry;

(ii) extending from 10 miles west of the Calexico, California, port of entry to 5 miles east of the Douglas, Arizona, port of entry;

(iii) extending from 5 miles west of the Columbus, New Mexico, port of entry to 10 miles east of El Paso, Texas;

(iv) extending from 5 miles northwest of the Del Rio, Texas, port of entry to 5 miles southeast of the Eagle Pass, Texas, port of entry; and

(v) extending 15 miles northwest of the Laredo, Texas, port of entry to the Brownsville, Texas, port of entry.[5]

The law also directed the secretary to install surveillance cameras along the stretch of fence between Calexico, California, and Douglas, Arizona.[2]

 

Northern border

Section 4 of the Secure Fence Act directed the secretary of homeland security to conduct a study regarding a security system along the northern border. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the necessity of constructing a system, the feasibility of such a system, and the economic impact it could have along the border.[2]

 

 

 

Customs and Border Patrol authority

Section 5 of the Secure Fence Act directed the secretary of homeland security to evaluate the extent of the authority of Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) to stop vehicles entering the United States illegally and determine whether its authority should be expanded. Under the law, the secretary was also directed to evaluate the use of technology by the CBP to stop vehicles and determine whether such technology should be updated. Finally, the secretary was directed to evaluate the training provided to CBP officers regarding stopping vehicles.[2]

 

Debate

Debate concerning the Secure Fence Act primarily surrounded the construction of 700 miles of border fencing. Questions arose about whether building a fence was ethical, whether it would be effective, and whether it would harm foreign relations with Mexico.

 

Supporters of building the fence argued that the United States, as a sovereign nation, was justified in securing its borders and that doing so would make immigrating to the United States fairer for legal immigrants. They argued that the fence would effectively slow illegal immigration by forcing individuals seeking to cross illegally to attempt to do so in heavily patrolled areas. This extra difficulty would deter more individuals from attempting to cross, proponents contended. In addition, by slowing illegal immigration, supporters argued that the fence would improve national security. It could also improve foreign relations with Mexico as perceived issues with illegal immigration were reduced.[6]

 

Opponents of the fence argued that it would divide communities that exist along the border and possibly cut off some farmers’ access to water. They also argued that the fence would not deter illegal immigration and would instead put border crossers in greater danger by forcing them to cross via treacherous routes. Crossers could also go around, climb over, or dig under the fence, and a fence would not stop illegal entry via the use of falsified documents. Because the fence would not deter illegal immigration, opponents countered that it would also not improve national security and could even incentivize criminals to become more organized. Opponents contended that the fence would worsen foreign relations with Mexico by sending a signal of distrust and an insult to the idea of “good neighbors.”

 

https://ballotpedia.org/Secure_Fence_Act_of_2006

 

From what I’ve been reading this 2006 law was seen as the first step in Comprehensive Immigration Reform and the fence portion is at best a “patch job”. Many of the Senators are still in office and have changed their stance on the fence because President Trump wants it built and called it a “Wall”. More importantly there must be legislative reform of the loopholes that allow unfettered access to our borders by those choosing to enter illegally (such as DACA).

 

Other “state actors” have taken advantage of the lack of support and confusion by members of Congress in failing to support President Trump’s vision of a secure southern border. They have financed, organized and/or executed plans for massive waves of invaders in a grand attempt to overwhelm US law enforcement officials at the border.

 

This has been compounded by a number of individuals AND city, county, state and US Legislative Officials who willfully violate US Immigration laws by aiding the unlawful entry of aliens which is a federal offense prosecutable under federal statutes.

 

Another point of contention has been a Presidential Executive Order to stem the tide of immigrants coming into the United States as seen in Title 8 U.S. Code 1182 – Inadmissible aliens (f) Suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by President. “Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate.”

 

This brings us to the topic of birthright citizenship as defined by the 14th Amendment which says “[a]ll persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof” are citizens”.

 

So contrary to popular belief or what the media and even member of Congress have led us to believe, in 1898 the Supreme Court of the United States laid out the requirements for birthright U.S. citizenship. The first requirement is that a person’s parents must be in this country legally. The second requirement is that they have a legal residence within the United States at the time of their birth. Any person who DOES NOT MEET those 2 requirements IS NOT a citizen of the United States.

 

Citizenship gained under false pretenses can and should be revoked and that person may be deported and those who assisted someone in gaining citizenship falsely may be fined and imprisoned and have their US citizenship revoked and result in their being deported as well. – I am the Real Truckmaster!

 

Realtruckmaster.blog

MeWe.Com/The_Real_Truckmaster_Series_2019

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s